White Paper

To Build Or Buy An Enterprise Technology Solution

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Few wealth management CIOs miss the days when implementing a sales enablement solution meant tackling a multimillion-dollar, multi-year project that required extensive IT involvement. Today, any AUM-sized firm has access to affordable, versatile, cloud-based platforms that enable marketing, compliance and advisor teams to manage and produce branded, data-rich materials, from client presentations to portfolio reports and disclosure correspondences.

In the midst of this rapid technological revolution, CIOs are quickly realizing the need to provide their firms with standardized digital processes that deliver consistently personalized content predicated on reliable data across mobile or tablet devices. But introducing a sales enablement platform isn't just about leveraging the latest innovations; it's about empowering wealth managers to meet the evolving expectations of their dynamic market segments. And in today's hyper-competitive, thin-margined environment, it's critical for firms to deliver the most value possible, while creating new operational efficiencies throughout the organization and its technology infrastructure. Whether an advisor works with a high-earner-not-rich-yet (HENRY) Millennial or an ultra-high-net-worth (UHNW) Baby Boomer, it is absolutely possible to provide a standardized yet personalized omni-channel client experience. 

Firms seeking enterprise-grade sales enablement solutions that include data aggregation and selective distribution controls first have a questions to answer: Should they custom-build internally or partner with an external vendor?

This whitepaper reveals why enterprises need not wait to access a technology platform they can call their own and why they no longer have to undertake massive, capital-consuming development efforts to do so. It also delves into three common reasons firms look at building before buying, and why the rationale for each of the former may not be the most strategically beneficial over time.